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* BENTON'S* 

szur spacing Type. 



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BENTON, WALDO & CO., 

Sole Manufacturers, 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. ST. PAUL, MINN. 




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BENTON'S SELF SPACINC TYPE. 



Among the users of our Patent Self Spacing Type may be found the follow- 
ing persons and firms, to any of whom we refer for opinions of the invention : 



Pratt Brothers, Marlboro, Mass. 
Cramer, Aikens & Cramer, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Northwestern Newspaper Union, St. Paul, Minn. 
Western Newspaper Union, Omaha, Neb. 
Miner Publishing Co., Butte, Montana. 
Brown, Treacy & Co., St. Paul, Minn. 
Tribune Job Printing Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
L. B. & F. E. Noyes, Marinette, Wis., (burned 

out, ordered second lot.) 
McGlachlin & Simons, Stevens Point, Wis. 
Sioux Falls Pub. Co., Sioux Falls, Dak. 
Minnesota Coffee and Spiee Co., St. Paul, Minn. 
Reporter Publishing Co., Oconto, Wis. 
Fisk Brothers, Helena, Montana. 
W. C. Thomas, Sheboygan Falls, Wis. 
E. W. Viall & Co., (Daily Times) Oshkosh, Wis. 
Pioneer Publishing Co., Mandan, Dak. 
Intermountain Pub. Co., Butte City, Montana. 
Recorder Printing Co., Janesville, Wis. 
Commonwealth Printing Co., Fond du Lac, Wis. 
Bastian Bros., Fulton, 111. 
Johnson Bros. & Amos, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Perry & Ervin, Fulton, 111. 
P. V. Deuster & Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

D. Ramaley & Son, St. Paul, Minn. 
J. B. Henck, Longwood, Florida. 
Augustana Book Concern, Rock Island, 111. 
Western Newspaper Union, St. Louis, Mo. 
Dana & Stecketee, Muskegon, Mich. 

J. G. Patterson, Edgerton, Wis. 
W. G. Blymyer, Mansfield, Ohio. 
Geo. W. Hopp, Brookings, Dak. 
Sherman & Hutchins, Beaver Dam, Wis. 
Ellsworth & Harmon, Ripon, Wis. 
Kimball & Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
George Alderson & Son, Tomah, Wis. 

E. C. Huntington, Windom, Minn. 

J. S. Letford & Son, Lamberton, Minn. 

F. M. Cornell, Tower City, Dak. 
R. S. Toland, Cass City, Mich. 
D. S. Johnson, Merrill, Wis. 

Hamlin & Ingalls, Blue Earth City, Minn. 

C. M. Hutchinson, Necedah, Wis. 

Eli & C. E. Hooker, Waupun, Wis. 

Journal Printing Co., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, New Haven, Conn. 

Edwin Hurlbut, Oconomowoc, Wis. 

Ingersoll & Ely, St. Croix Falls, Wis. 

W. H. Cannon, Merrill, Wis. 

Youmans & Randall, Waukesha, Wis. 

Post Publishing Co., Appleton, Wis. 

Moran & Ball, Onalaska, Wis. 

The Star, Marinette, Wis. 

Union Printing Co., Rock Island, 111. 

The Express Pub. Co., Beatrice, Neb. 

W. H. Weeks, Lewiston, Maine. 

Geo. Schlosser, Blunt, Dak. 

J. B. Cheadle, Frankfort, Ind. 

Lane Bros, Norton, Mass. 

Graves & Lawson, West St. Paul, Minn. 

J. W. Chaffee, Marion, Iowa. 



H. J. Lohmar, Wausau, Wis. 

The Engel-Dreis Co., St. Paul, Minn. 

S. H. Watson, St. Paul, Minn. 

D. D. Donnan, Elkader, Iowa. 

C. E. Davenport, South Otselic, N. Y. 

E. O. Johnson, Hayward, Wis. 
A. C. Voshardt, Kewaunee, Wis. 
James Moore, Watertown, Wis. 
C. J. Wonzer, Tama, Iowa. 
John D. Metz, Dubuque, Iowa. 

C. A. Bennett, Granite Falls, Minn. 
W. L. Norris, Watertown, Wis. 
J. H. Yewdale & Sons, Milwaukee, Wis. 
The Labor Review, Milwaukee, Wis. 
H. D. Wing, Kaukauna, Wis. 
Frank H. Brady, Clintonville, Wis. 
W. E. Clarke, Manistique, Mich. 

G. W. Barrows, Rapid City, Dakota. 
Progress Publishing Co., Omaha, Neb. 

F. E. Merrill, Freeport, Maine. 
Baker, Collins & Co., St. Paul, Minn. 

H. R. Curtis Printing Co., St. Paul, Minn. 
C. D. Auyer, Little Falls, Minn. 

Fell & Vroman, Lewiston, Mont. Ter, 

W. G. Ashton, Wilmot, D. T. 

W. O. Evans, Bellevue, Iowa. 

E. B. Usher, La Crosse, Wis. 

Mille Bunnell, Duluth, Minn. 

L. H. Morehouse, Milwaukee, Wis. 

C. P. Smith, Oconomowoc, Wis. 
Frank Thornburg, Clinton, Iowa. 
L. M. Hartwick, Pentwater Mich. 
W. H. Peck, Platteville, Wis. 

Journal Publishing Co., Helena, Montana. 

H. N. Ross, Sheboygan, Wis. 

A. F. Judd, Rockford, Wis. 

U. B. Shaver, Kasson, Minn. 

Bigelow Bros., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Review & Herald, Battle Creek, Mich. 

J. Dolph & Son. Eldora, Iowa. 

E. L. Howe, London, Wis. 

Oliver Bros., Waupun, Wis. 

D. H. Winget, Clinton, Iowa. 

Leroy M. Stringham & Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 
Park & Kenny, Elkhorn, Wis. 
Wm. B. Minahan, Chilton, Wis. 

G. M. Myers, Lanark, 111. 
Burleson Bros., Pewaukee, Wis. 
Burdick & Armitage, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Godfrey & Crandall, " " 
M. J. Cantw r ell, Madison, Wis. 

E. B. Stillman, Jefferson, Iowa. 

Omaha Litho. & Stationery Co., Omaha, Neb. 

J. J. Cummings, Omaha, Neb. 

P. B. Haber, Fond du Lac, Wis. 

J. B. Hedge, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Samuel Rees Printing Co., Omaha, Neb. 

A. P. Bradt, Oswego Falls, N. Y. 

Unity Pub. Co., Providence, R. I. 

Miller, Botsford & Co., Rockford, 111. 

H. 0. Fifield, Menominee, Mich. 



Other Names Furnished on Application. 



BENTON, WALDO & CO, 



Milwaukee, Wis, 



St. Paul, Minn. 



EXPLANATION 

OF THE PRINCIPLE OF 

Benton's Self Spacing Type. 



The common widths of book pages, mis- 
cellaneous jobs and newspaper columns are 
some number of Pica ems, therefore the Pica 
em is taken as the basis for Self Spacing type. 
The thinnest space in all fonts is some exact 
fraction of a Pica, and this fraction of Pica 
is called the unit of measure. All characters, 
spaces and quads in the font are made some 
exact multiple of this unit in width, so that 
the sizes of all faces will work perfectly to- 
gether in the regular labor-saving measures. 
This unit of measure may be one-sixth, one- 
seventh, one-eighth, one-ninth, one-tenth, etc. 
of a Pica em, as may be. .desired, to produce 
condensed, medium or extended faces. The 
following table gives the sizes of bodies, units 
of measure, and lengths of alphabets. In the 
first column will be found the various sizes of 
bodies; in the second, the number of units 
contained in one em Pica; and in the third 
the measurements of a lower case alphabet 
in the ems of each particular body: 



Body. 


Number 
Units to 
Pica em. 


Length of 
Alphabet. 


51/2 


Point 




13 


15% 


51/2 


Point 




12 


16% 


6 


Point 


(Nonpareil) ... 


13 


141/3 


6 


Point 


(Nonpareil) ... 


12 


151/2 


6 


Point 


(Nonpareil) ... 


11 


16% 


6 


Point 


(Nonpareil) ... 


10 


18% 


7 


Point 




12 


131/4 


7 


Point 


(Minion) 


11 


14Vo 


7 


Point 


(Minion) 


10 


16 


8 


Point 


(Brevier) 


10 


14 


8 


Point 


(Brevier) 


9 


151/2 


8 


Point 


(Brevier) 


8 


171/2 


9 


Point 


(Bourgeois)... 


10 


123/ 8 


9 


Point 


(Bourgeois)... 


9 


1334 


9 


Point 


(Bourgeois)... 


8 


151/2 


10 


Point 


(L'g Primer) . 


9 


123/ 8 


10 


Point 


(L'g Primer) . 


8 


14 


11 


Point 


(Small Pica).. 


8 


12% 


11 


Point 


(Small Pica).. 


7 


14i/ 2 


12 


Point 


(Pica) 


8 


11% 


12 


Point 


(Pica) 


7 


131/4 


12 


Point 


(Pica) 


6 


151/2 


In the foregoing table will be noticed a Non- 



pareil with one-twelfth of Pica as the unit of 



measure. This is one sixth of the body of 
Nonpareil, or the six-to-em-space, which pre- 



serves in this particular font the old three-to- 
em space and the old en and em quads. The 
same is true of the Brevier on one-ninth of 
Pica, the Bourgeois on one-eighth of Pica and 
the Pica on one-sixth of Pica. 

The Minion on one-twelfth of Pica will 
have as its unit a seven-to-em-space, or one- 
seventh of the Minion body, and will set at 
right angles or work into squares of the 
body, as will also the Pica on one-seventh of 
Pica. The Nonpareil 011 one-tenth of Pica 
has the old five-to-em space of Nonpareil as 
its unit, and will work into squares of Non- 
pareil or Pica. 

In a complete font of the old kind of body 
type there are about 190 widths of bodies. 
Appended is a table showing the different 
widths of bodies of Self Spacing Old Style. 
It will be readily seen that there are but nine 
widths of bodies all told, and that the four- 
unit width predominates largely over any 
other, there being fifty-nine characters of this 
width. We omit the Italic characters from 
the table as they all go on the same widths 
of bodies, and are interchangeable with the 
Roman: 

1 unit — Space 1 

2 units— Space, f i j l ,:;.-'! I J ' |.. 16 

3 units— Quad, cerstz ? )] *'fj§|| 

I I J s z - 22 

4 units— Quad, abdghknop q u 

Txyfifl ff$ £ 1 2 3 4 5 6 
7890 SZabcdefgl 

NOPQRTUYX Y & .. — \ 



5 units— set ABCDEFGLNOPQ 

RTUYYhkm 21 

6 units— Quad, mftwffifflceHKX 

& w M ce lb ^ @ — ... 24 V2 

3/4 % % % % % % 28 

7 units— M W 2 

8 units— JB CE 2 

12_units— Quad, ...... ■= c ^ 5 

9 sizes. Roman characters 233 

Italic charactters 77 

233 

In Roman fonts, except Old Style, there are 
but eight widths of bodies, the eight unit 
width being omitted. 

Any compositor can see that no combina- 
tion of units can be made that will not come 



within a certain number of exact units of fill- 
ing a line. If a line of matter lacks, it must 
lack one or more exact units. 

Self Spacing type sets line for line with the 
ordinary Roman, where the lengths of the 
alphabets are the same. 

Repeated experiments with the new type 
have shown that the average compositor 
gains about twenty-five per cent, in speed, 
with no trouble in justification whatever. In 
the matter of the correction of proofs the 
gain is enormous. Say there is an "a" for an 
"e"; as "a" is four units wide and "e" three, 
"e" and a one-unit space justify the line per- 
fectly. Even this measure of trouble is avoid- 
ed in many instances. As twenty-six of the 
most common lower case characters are of 
the same width, they can be substituted for 
one another without the change of a space. 

Another item worthy of consideration is 
the greater durability of the type. It is al- 
ways on its feet, and therefore is not worn 
by "pounding." 

In tabular work there is a great gain in 
speed and neatness. By the addition of a 
new character, viz: "[", it is easy to set per- 
pendicular lines of any length, line upon line. 

Self Spacing type does not require a con- 
scious effort to master its principle — the com- 
positor acquires intuitively and at once all 
that is necessary for the perfect use of the 
S3^stem. He is relieved of the mental process 
of spacing and justifying which he now goes 
through. 

This system secures a proper relation be- 
tween letters, spaces and figures. Under the 
present lack of system in the old kind of 
type, the three-em space and the en figure 
are used, no matter whether the face be ex- 
panded or compressed; in Self Spacing type 
every character and space will be increased 
or decreased in width relatively with the face 
of the type. 

The italic letters have been made to har- 
monize with the Roman letters. 

It may be repeated that the compositor 
has nothing to learn in handling the Self 
Spacing type. There is but a single direction 
to be given — to set that which looks like the 
em quad (six-unit quad) with the nick out. 

Whoever will study the principle on which 
the Self Spacing type is based, will readily 
admit that it is bound to secure easy and 
perfect justification, greatly increased speed 



and consequent enormous saving, simplicity 
and rapidity of proof correction, and in- 
creased accuracy and ease in the setting of 
tables. All these points are beyond question, 
as certainly as the proposition that two and 
two make four is not open to argument. No 
rational person can doubt them. 

i 



No.l No. 2 



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No. 3 



i|dle 

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not|i 



No. 4. 



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nine (units 
incre|ased 
comp|ress 
Repea|ted 
second | on 
say the | re 



No. 5 



i|&H 
s|NK 
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mi|X 
we|T 
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this | ! 



No. 6 



1 1 and 
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B|rot 
M|tly 
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SB | at 

PA|st 

ha|D 

FEl|Z 
SEA 1 1 
NOTji 



No. 7 



'Idle 
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EIok 
H|ad 
SI|es 
BI|ts 
SU|it 
FO|x 
CH|e 
234li 



To further explain and illustrate the ease 
with which table work is done with Self 
Spacing type, we show above an example of 
miscellaneous justifications, which is abso- 
lutely impossible to accomplish with the old 
kind of type. In column No. 1 the first line 
begins with the lower case "i", two units 
wide, which is followed by the upright dash 
"I", two units, and the characters "a", four 
units, "n", four units, "d", four units, com- 
prising sixteen units to accurately fill the 
column. The second line begins with "s", 
three units wide, which throws the space rule 
one unit further to the right than in the pre- 
ceeding line. In each succeeding line lower 
case characters are employed to the total 
width of sixteen units, and such characters 
are chosen for the first part thereof as will 
admit of advancing the space rule to the 
right exactly one unit in each succeeding line. 

In column No. 2 the same plan is followed, 
the only change being the substitution of 
capital for lower case letters. No. 3 is also 
a repetition of the example with small cap 
characters. 

The central column, No. 4, is thirty-one 
units wide, contains upper and lower case 
characters, and the space rule is carried to 
the right two units in each succeeding line. 

In columns Nos. 5, 6, and 7, caps, small 
caps, lower case characters and figures are 
used promiscuously, all columns coming per- 
fectly justified in lines perpendicularly at a 
width of sixteen units in each. 

This piece of composition was done in a full 
measure stick, and set line upon line in the 
ordinary manner of straight reading matter. 



S^-point (Agate) Self Spacing, No. 19 *2- 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 12 to pica. 



Roman, per pound, 80 cts. Italic, per pound, 92 cts. 



Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries as in the art of type set- 
ting. The machines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater part of the 
enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as type was set four hundred years ago. 
If Franklin could come from among the shades and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development of the art to correspond with the evo- 
lution of the marvelous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, laborious hand presses of 
half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of stereotyping, folding, pasting and mailing. 
Increased speed in the setting of the same quantity of matter has been secured only by the 
multiplication of cases. All efforts to promote speed and economy in type setting has been 
directed toward the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the improvement of the art 
of hand setting. The attempt to introduce new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious 
effort to gain in speed, since the adoption of any number would prove only an annoyance in- 
stead of a help, through the confusion arising from the great multiplication of characters, and 
the necessary re-arrangement of the case. One of the supreme obstacles in the way of the suc- 
cess of type setting machines has been the necessity of hand justification. In connection with 
the difficulty of distribution, this has been sufficient to prevent the general adoption of machines. 
It is evident that whatever device will overcome this obstacle will also simplify justification in 
hand work; and as this is the check to speed in hand work, any means to simplify spacing and 
justification must increase the ease and speed of type setting by hand. This is done by Mr. 
Benton's Self Spacing type. Strictly speaking it doesn't space itself — but the spacing becomes 
a matter of such simplicity and accuracy that "self spacing" is the expression that comes to 
the lips of the compositor. The Self Spacing type was designed for the type setting machines, 
and it entirely overcomes the obstacle of hand justification. The most accurate justification can 
be done by the machine when this type is used. Naturally, it simplifies the work of spacing and 
justification in hand work. It enables the compositor to set one-third moie type in a given 
time. It not only secures an increase in speed of 33 per cent, in type setting, but it secures 



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S^-point (Agate) Self Spacing, No. 19. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 12 to pica. 



Roman, per pound, 80 cts. Italic, per pound, 92 cts. 



Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries as in the art of type set- 
ting. The machines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater part of the 
enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as type was set four hundred years ago. 
If Franklin could come from among the shades and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development of the art to correspond with the evo- 
lution of the marvelous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, laborious hand presses of 
half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of stereotyping, folding, pasting and mailing. 
Increased speed in the setting of the same quantity of matter has been secured only by the 
multiplication of cases. All efforts to promote speed and economy in type setting has been 
directed toward the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the improvement of the art 
of hand setting. The attempt to introduce new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious 
effort to gain in speed, since the adoption of any number would prove only an annoyance in- 
stead of a help, through the confusion arising from the great multiplication of characters, and 
the necessary re-arrangement of the case. One of the supreme obstacles in the way of the suc- 
cess of type setting machines has been the necessity of hand justification. In connection with 
the difficulty of distribution, this has been sufficient to prevent the general adoption of machines. 
It is evident that whatever device will overcome this obstacle will also simplify justification m 
hand work; and as this is the check to speed in hand work, any means to simplify spacing and 
justification must increase the ease and speed of type setting by hand. This is done by Mr. 
Benton's Self Spacing type. Strictly speaking it doesn't space itself— but the spacing becomes 
a matter of such simplicity and accuracy that "self spacing" is the expression that conies to 
the lips of the compositor. The Self Spacing type was designed for the type setting machines, 
and it entirely overcomes the obstacle of hand justification. The most accurate justification can 
be done by the machine when this type is used. Naturally, it simplifies the work of spacing and 
justification in hand work. It enables the compositor to set one-third more type in a given 
time. It not only secures an increase in speed of 33 per cent, in type setting, but it secures 

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 & % % Ys % % % % % 12 3 4567890 

V 3 



6-point (Nonpareil) Self Spacing, No. 20 1 2- 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 12 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 68 cts. Italic, per pound, 78 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries as in the art of type set- 
ting. The machines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater part of the 
enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as type was set four hundred years ago. 
If Franklin could come from among the shades and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development of the art to correspond with the evo- 
lution of the marvelous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, laborious hand presses of 
half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of stereotyping, folding, pasting and mailing. 
Increased speed in the setting of the same quantity of matter has been secured only by the 
multiplication of cases. All efforts to promote speed and economy in type setting has been 
directed toward the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the improvement of the art 
of hand setting. The attempt to introduce new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious 
effort to gain in speed, since the adoption of any number would prove only an annoyance in- 
stead of a help, through the confusion arising from the great multiplication of characters, and 
the necessary re-arrangement of the case. One of the supreme obstacles in the way of the suc- 
cess of type setting machines has been the necessity of hand justification. In connection with 
the difficulty of distribution, this has been sufficient to prevent the general adoption of machines. 
It is evident that whatever device will overcome this obstacle will also simplify justification in 
hand work; and as this is the check to speed in hand work, any means to simplify spacing and 
justification must increase the ease and speed of type setting by hand. This is done by Mr. 
Benton's Self Spacing type. Strictly speaking it doesn't space itself — but the spacing becomes 
a matter of such simplicity and accuracy that "self spacing" is the expression that comes to 
the lips of the compositor. The Self Spacing type was designed for the type setting machine, 
and it entirely overcomes the obstacle of hand justification. The most accurate justification can 
be done by the machine when this type is used. Naturally, it simplifies the work of spacing and 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 % Yz S A Ys % Ys % % % 1234567890 



6-point (Nonpareil) Self Spacing, No. 20. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 12 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 68 cts. Italic, per pound, 78 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries as in the art of type set- 
ting. The machines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater part of the 
enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as type was set four hundred years ago. 
If Franklin could come from among the shades and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development of the art to correspond with the evo- 
lution of the marvelous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, laborious hand presses of 
half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of stereotyping, folding, pasting and mailing. 
Increased speed in the setting of the same quantity of matter has been secured only by the 
multiplication of cases. All efforts to promote speed and economy in type setting has been 
directed toward the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the improvement of the art 
of hand setting. The attempt to introduce new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious 
effort to gain in speed, since the adoption of any number would prove only an annoyance in- 
stead of a help, through the confusion arising from the great multiplication of characters, and 
the necessary re-arrangement of the case. One of the supreme obstacles in the way of the suc- 
cess of type setting machines has been the necessity of hand justification. In connection with 
the difficulty of distribution, this has been sufficient to prevent the general adoption of machines. 
It is evident that whatever device will overcome this obstacle will also simplify justification in 
hand work; and as this is the check to speed in hand work, any means to simplify spacing and 
justification must increase the ease and speed of type setting by hand. This is done by Mr. 
Benton's Self Spacing type. Strictly speaking it doesn't space itself— but the spacing becomes 
a matter of such simplicity and accuracy that "self spacing" is the expression that comes to 
the lips of the compositor. The Self Spacing type was designed for the type setting machines, 
and it entirely overcomes the obstacle of hand justification. The most accurate justification can 
be done by the machine when this type is used. Naturally, it simplifies the work of spacing and 

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 }4 Yz % Ya % Ys % % % 1234567890 



4 



7-point (Minion) Self Spacing, No. 23*2. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 11 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 60 cts. Italic, per pound, 70 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries as in the art of 
type setting. The machines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater 
part of the enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as type was set four 
hundred years ago. If Franklin could come from among the shades, and take his place 
before the case, he would have nothing to learn. There has been no development of the 
art to correspond with the evolution of the marvelous perfecting presses of to-day from 
the slow, laborious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the growth of the art 
of stereotyping, folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the setting of the 
same quantity of matter has been secured only by the multiplication of cases. All efforts 
to promote speed and economy in type setting have been directed toward the perfecting 
of type setting machines rather than the improvement of the art of hand setting. The 
attempt to introduce new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gain 
in speed, since the adoption of any number would prove only an annoyance instead of 
a help, through the confusion arising from the great multiplication of characters, and 
the necessary re-arrangement of the case. One of the supreme obstacles in the way of 
the success of type setting machines has been the necessity of hand justification. In con- 
nection with the difficulty of distribution, this has been sufficient to prevent the general 
adoption of machines. It is evident that whatever device will overcome this obstacle 
will also simplify justification in hand work; and as this is the check to speed in hand 
work, any means to simplify spacing and justification must increase the ease and speed 
work, any means to simplify spacing and justification must increase the ease and speed 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 V4Y2M Vs % % % % % 1234567890 



7-point (Minion) Self Spacing, No. 23. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 11 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 60 cts. Italic, per pound, 70 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries as in the art of 
type setting. The machines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater 
part of the enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as type was set four 
hundred years ago. If Franklin could come from among the shades, and take his place 
before the case, he would have nothing to learn. There has been no development of the 
art to correspond with the evolution of the marvelous perfecting presses of to-day from 
the slow, laborious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the growth of the art 
of stereotyping, folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the setting of the 
same quantity of matter has been secured only by the multiplication of cases. All efforts 
to promote speed and economy in type setting has been directed toward the perfecting 
of type setting machines rather than the improvement of the art of hand setting. The 
attempt to introduce new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gam 
in speed, since the adoption of any number would prove only an annoyance instead of 
a help, through the confusion arising from the great multiplication of characters, and 
the necessary re-arrangement of the case. One of the supreme obstacles in the way of 
the success of type setting machines has been the necessity of hand justification. In con- 
nection with the difficulty of distribution, this has been sufficient to prevent the general 
adoption of machines. It is evident that whatever device will overcome this obstacle 
will also simplify justification in hand work; and as this is the check to speed in hand 
work, any means to simplify spacing and justification must increase the ease and speed 
work, any means to simplify spacing and justification must increase the ease and speed 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 % % % % % Vs % % % 



5 



8-point (Brevier) Self Spacing, No. 18 12. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 10 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 55 cts. Italic, per pound, 65 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries as in the 
art of type setting. The machines, some of which are in use, are still ineffi- 
cient, and the greater part of the enormous and increasing quantity of type 
used is set as type was set four hundred years ago. If Franklin could come 
from among the shades, and take his place before the case, he would have noth- 
ing to learn. There has been no development of the art to correspond with 
the evolution of the marvelous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, labor- 
ious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of 
stereotyping, folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the setting of 
the same quantity of matter has been secured only by the multiplication of 
cases. All efforts to promote speed and economy in type setting have been 
directed toward the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the im- 
provement of the art of hand setting. The attempt to introduce new logotypes 
is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gain in speed, since the adoption of 
any number would prove only an annoyance instead of a help, through the 
confusion arising from the great multiplication of characters, and the necessary 
re-arrangement of the case. One of the supreme obstacles in the way of the 
success of type setting machines has been the necessity of hand justification. 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

1234567890 %%%%%%%%% 1234567890 



8-point (Brevier) Self Spacing 1 , No. 18. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 10 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 55 cts. Italic, per pound, 65 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries as in the 
art of type setting. The machines, some of which are in use, are still ineffi- 
cient, and the greater part of the enormous and increasing quantity of type 
used is set as type was set four hundred years ago. If Franklin could come 
from among the shades, and take his place before the case, he would have noth- 
ing to learn. There has been no development of the art to correspond with 
the evolution of the marvelous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, labor- 
ious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of 
stereo typing, folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the setting of 
the same quantity of matter has been secured only by the multiplication of 
cases. All efforts to promote speed and economy in type setting have been 
directed toward the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the im- 
provement of the art of hand setting. The attempt to introduce new logotypes 
is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gain in speed, since the adoption of 
any number would prove only an annoyance instead of a help, through the 
confusion arising from the great multiplication of characters, and the necessary 
re-arrangement of the case. One of the supreme obstacles in the way of the 
success of type setting machines has been the necessity of hand justification. 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

1234567890 %%%%%%%%% 1234567890 



6 



n 



9-point (Bourgeois) Self Spacing, No. 32 1 2. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 9 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 50 cts. Italic, per pound, 60 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries 
as in the art of type setting. The machines, some of which are in use, 
are still inefficient, and the greater part of the enormous and increasing 
quantity of type used is set as type was set four hundred years ago. 
If Franklin could come from among the shades, and take his place be- 
fore the case, he would have nothing to learn. There has been no de- 
velopment of the art to correspond with the evolution of the marvelous 
perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, laborious hand presses of 
half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of stereotyping, fold- 
ing, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the setting of the same 
quantity of matter has been secured only by the multiplication of cases. 
All efforts to promote speed and economy in type setting has been dir- 
ected toward the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the 
improvement of the art of hand setting. The attempt to introduce 
new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gain in speed, 
new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gain in speed, 

abcdefghij klmnopqrstuvwxyz 

123456 7890 %%%%%%%%% 1234567890 



9-point (Bourgeois) Self Spacing, No. 32. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 9 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 50 cts. Italic, per pound, 60 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries 
as in the art of type setting. The machines, some of which are in use, 
are still inefficient, and the greater part of the enormous and increasing 
quantity of type used is set as type was set four hundred years ago. 
If Franklin could come from among the shades, and take his place be- 
fore the case, he would have nothing to learn. There has been no de- 
velopment of the art to correspond with the evolution of the marvelous 
perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, laborious hand presses of 
half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of stereotyping, fold- 
ing, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the setting of the same 
quantity of matter has been secured only by the multiplication of cases. 
All efforts to promote speed and economy in type setting have been dir- 
ected toward the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the 
improvement of the art of hand setting. The attempt to introduce 
new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gain in speed, 
new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gain in speed, 

abcdefghij klmnopqrstuvwxyz 
1234567890 %%%%%%%%% 



lO-point (Long Primer) Self Spacing, No. 17 *2. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, »83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 8 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 48 cts. Italic, per pound, 56 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four cen- 
turies as in the art of type setting. The machines, some of 
which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater part of the 
enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as type 
was set four hundred years ago. If Franklin could come from 
among the shades, and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development of the 
art to correspond with the evolution of the marvelous perfect- 
ing presses of to-day from the slow, laborious hand presses of 
half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of stereotyp- 
ing, folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the setting 
of the same quantity of matter has been secured only by the 
multiplication of cases. All efforts to promote speed and econ- 
omy in type setting has been directed toward the perfecting of 
type setting machines rather than the improvement of the art 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

12345 67890 %%%%%%%%% 1234567890 



lO-point (Long Primer) Self Spacing, No. 17. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 8 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 48 cts. Italic, per pound, 56 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four cen- 
turies as in the art of type setting. The machines, some of 
which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater part of the 
enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as type 
was set four hundred years ago. If Franklin could come from 
among the shades, and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development of the 
art to correspond with the evolution of the marvelous perfect- 
ing presses of to-day from the slow, laborious hand presses of 
half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of stereotyp- 
ing, folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the setting 
of the same quantity of matter has been secured only by the 
multiplication of cases. All efforts to promote speed and econ- 
omy in type setting has been directed toward the perfecting of 
type setting machines rather than the improvement oi the art 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 



1234567890 



1234567890 



11-point (Small Pica) Self Spacing, No. 2V2. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 7 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 46 cts. Italic, per pound, 52 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in 
four centuries as in the art of type setting. The ma- 
chines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and 
the greater part of the enormous and increasing quan- 
tity of type used is set as type was set four hundred 
years ago. If Franklin could come from among the 
shades, and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development 
of the art to correspond with the evolution of the mar- 
velous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, labor- 
ious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the 
growth of the art of stereotyping, folding, pasting and 
mailing. Increased speed in the setting of the same 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

1234567890 %%%%%%%%% 
123456789 



11-point (Small Pica) Self Spacing, No. 21. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 7 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 46 cts. Italic, per pound, 52 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in 
four centuries as in the art of type setting. The ma- 
chines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and 
the' greater part of the enormous and increasing quan- 
tity of type used is set as type was set four hundred 
years ago. If Franklin could come from among the 
shades, and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development 
of the art to correspond with the evolution of the mar- 
velous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, labor- 
ious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the 
growth of the art of stereotyping, folding, pasting and 
mailing. Increased speed in the setting of the same 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 %%%%% % % % % 



9 




12-point (Pica) Self Spacing", No. 31 1 2. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 7 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 44 cts. Italic, per pound, 50 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in 
four centuries as in the art of type setting. The ma- 
chines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and 
the greater part of the enormous and increasing quan- 
tity of type used is set as type was set four hundred 
years ago. If Franklin could come from among the 
shades, and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development 
of the art to correspond with the evolution of the mar- 
velous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, labor- 
ious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the 
growth of the art of stereotyping, folding, pasting, and 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 
12 34567890 %%%%%%%%% 



12-point (Pica) Self Spacing, No. 31. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 7 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 44 cts. Italic, per pound, 50 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in 
four centuries as in the art of type setting. The ma- 
chines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and 
the greater part of the enormous and increasing quan- 
tity of type used is set as type was set four hundred 
years ago. If Franklin could come from among the 
shades, and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development 
of the art to correspond with the evolution of the mar- 
velous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, labor- 
ious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the 
growth of the art of stereotyping, folding, pasting and 



abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 
1234567890 %%%%%%%%% 




6-point (Nonpareil) Self Spacing Old Style, No. 27. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 11 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 68 cts. Italic, per pound, 78 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries as in the art of 
type setting The machines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater 
part of the enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as type was set four 
hundred years ago. If Franklin could come from among the shades, and take his place 
before the case, he would have nothing to learn. There has been no development of the 
art to correspond with the evolution of the marvelous perfecting presses of to-day from 
the slow, laborious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the growth of the art 
of stereotyping, folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed m the setting of the 
same quantity of matter has been secured only by the multiplication of cases All ettorts 
to promote speed and economy in type setting have been diredted toward the perfecting 
of type setting machines rather than the improvement of the art of hand setting. The 
attempt to introduce new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gam 
in speed since the adoption of any number would prove only an annoyance instead ot 
a help through the confusion arising from the great multiplication of characters, and 
the necessary re-arrangement of the case. One of the supreme obstacles m the way of 
the success of type setting machines has been the necessity of hand justification. In con- 
nection with the difficulty of distribution, this has been sufficient to prevent the general 
adoption of machines. It is evident that whatever device will overcome this obstacle 
will also simplify justification in hand work; and as this is the check to speed in. hand 
work any means to simplify spacing and justification must increase the ease and speed 
of type setting by hand. This is done by Mr. Benton's Self Spacing type. Strictly 
speaking it does not space itself— but the spacing becomes a matter of such simplicity 
and accuracy that "self spacing" is the expression that comes to the lips oi the composi- 
tor The Self Spacing type was designed for the type setting machine, and it entirely 
overcomes the obstacle of hand justification. The most accurate justification can be 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 MY2%Ys % Vs % % % 



8-point (Brevier) Self Spacing Old Style, No. 22. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 10 to pica,. 
Roman, per pound, 55 cts. Italic, per pound, 65 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries as in the 
art of type setting. The machines, some of which are in use, are still ineffi- 
cient, and the greater part of the enormous and increasing quantity of type 
used is set as type was set four hundred years ago. If Franklin could come 
from among the shades, and take his place before the case, he would have noth- 
ing to learn. There has been no development of the art to correspond with 
the evolution of the marvelous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, labor- 
ious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of 
stereotyping, folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the setting of 
the same quantity of matter has been secured only by the multiplication of 
cases. All efforts to promote speed and economy in type setting have been 
diredted toward the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the im- 
provement of the art of hand setting. The attempt to introduce new logotypes 
is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gain in speed, since the adoption of 
any number would prove only an annoyance instead of a help, through the 
confusion arising from the great multiplication of chara&ers, and the necessary 
re-arrangement of the case. One of the supreme obstacles in the way of the 
success of type setting machines has been the necessity of hand justification. 
Man is wafted, night and day, waking and sleeping, at least twenty miles per 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 % i/ 2 % i/ 3 % y 8 %%y 8 1234567890 



11 



-r 



9-point (Bourgeois) Self Spacing- Old Style, No. 28. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 9 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 50 cts. Italic, per pound, 60 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four centuries 
as in the art of type setting. The machines, some of which are in use, 
are still inefficient, and the greater part of the enormous and increasing 
quantity of type used is set as type was set four hundred years ago. 
If Franklin could come from among the shades, and take his place be- 
fore the case, he would have nothing to learn. There has been no 
development of the art to correspond with the evolution of the marvel- 
ous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, laborious hand presses 
of half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of stereotyping, 
folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the setting of the same 
quantity of matter has been secured only by the multiplication of cases. 
All efforts to promote speed and economy in type setting have been 
directed toward the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the 
improvement of the art of hand setting. The attempt to introduce 
new logotypes is not to be regarded as a serious effort to gain speed, 
since the adoption of any number would be only an annoyance instead 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 % % % % % Vs % % % 1234567890 



lO-point (Long Primer) Self Spacing Old Style, No. 24. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 8 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 48 cts. Italic, per pound, 56 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four 
centuries as in the art of type setting. The machines, some of 
which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater part of 
the enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as 
type was set four hundred years ago. If Franklin could come 
from among the shades, and take his place before the case, he 
would have nothing to learn. There has been no development 
of the art to correspond with the evolution of the marvelous 
perfecting presses of to-day from the slow and laborious hand 
presses of half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of 
stereotyping, folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in 
the setting of the same quantity of matter has been secured 
only by the multiplication of cases. All efforts to promote 
speed and economy in type setting have been directed toward 
the perfecting of type setting machines rather than the improve- 
metit of the art of hand setting. The attempt to introduce new 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 % Vs % % 7 /s 



11-point (Small Pica) Self Spacing Old Style, No. 25. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 8 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 46 cts. Italic, per pound, 52 cts. 

Perhaps in no art has there been so little progress in four cen- 
turies as in the art of type setting. The machines, some of 
which are in use, are still inefficient, and the greater part of the 
enormous and increasing quantity of type used is set as type 
was set four hundred years ago. If Franklin could come from 
among the shades, and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development of the 
art to correspond with the evolution of the marvelous perfect- 
ing presses of to-day from the slow, laborious hand presses of 
half a century ago, or with the growth of the art of stereo- 
typing, folding, pasting and mailing. Increased speed in the 
setting of the same quantity of matter has been secured only 
by the multiplication of cases. All efforts to promote speed 
and economy in type setting has been directed toward the per- 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 
12345 67890 %%%%%%% %% 1234567890 



12-point (Pica) Self Spacing Old Style, No. 26. 

PAT'D DEC. 18, '83. 

The unit of measure of this font is 7 to pica. 
Roman, per pound, 44 cts. Italic, per pound, 50 cts. 

Perhaps in no art lias there been so little progress in 
four centuries as in the art of type setting. The ma- 
chines, some of which are in use, are still inefficient, and 
the greater part of the enormous and increasing quan- 
tity of type used is set as type was set four hundred 
years ago. If Franklin could come from among the 
shades, and take his place before the case, he would 
have nothing to learn. There has been no development 
of the art to correspond with the evolution of the mar- 
velous perfecting presses of to-day from the slow, labor- 
ious hand presses of half a century ago, or with the 
growth of the art of stereotyping, folding, pasting, and 

abcdefghij klmn op qrstu v wxy z 

12345 67890 % % % Vs % Vs % % % 

13 



Ik 



Self Spacing Old Style Italic. 

DESIGN PATENT APPLIED FOR. 



Circular Font. 8-Point (Brevier) Old Style Italic, No. 22. $5.40 

GAIN OF FOUR COMPOSITORS EQUAL TO COST OF TYPF. 

In January, 1886, I put in a font of Self Spacing and I am glad to state to you 
that from the total amount of composition of four compositors for sixty days, I 
estimate that the saving by increased composition was equal to the whole cost of 
the type. This favorable showing has induced me to add to the office, this month 



Circular Font. 9-Point (Bourgeois) Old Style Italic, No. 28. $4.80 

FOUR HUNDRED POUNDS MORE SELF SPACING 
In January, 1886, I put in a font of Self Spacing and I am glad to state 
to you that from the total amount of composition of four compositors 
for sixty days, I estimate that the saving by increased composition was 
equal to the whole cost of the type. This favorable showing has induced 



Circular Font. 10-Point (Long Primer) Old Style Italic, No. 24. $4.45 

SAVES THE WHOLE COST OF THE TYPE. 

In January, 1886, I put in a font of Self Spacing and J am glad 
to state to you that from the total amount of composition of four 
compositors for sixty days, I estimate that the saving by increas- 
ed composition was equal to the whole cost of the type. This 



Circular Font. 



11-Point (Small Pica) Old Style Italic, No. 25. 



$4.20 



GLOBE 9 JOB ROOMS-SAINT PAUL. 

In January, 1886, I put in a font of Self Spacing and I am 
glad to state to you that from the total amount of composition 
of four compositors for sixty days, I estimate that the saving by 
increased composition was equal to the whole cost of the type. 



Circular Font. 



12 -Point (Pica) Old Style Italic, No. 26. 



$3.95 



A RED LETTER-DO NOT READ IT, 

In January, 1886, I put in a font of Self Spacing and 
I am glad to state to you that from the total amount 
of composition of four compositors for sixty days, I esti- 



SPACES AND QUADS ARE INCLUDED WITH EACH FONT. 

14 



SPECIMENS OF TABLE WORK 

Composed as Straight Matter Across the Column. 

No Brass Rules used Except Adv. Rules at Top and Bottom. 



Chicago & North- Western 

RAILWAY. 

For Maps, Time Cards and Sleeping Car accom- 
modations apply at 102 Wisconsin Street, or at 
Depot, foot of Wisconsin Street, on Lake Shore. 



Chicago Express * 3:10 a.m. 

Chicago Parlor Car Exp., f 7:80 a.m. 
Chicago Parlor Car Exp.. fll:00 a. m. 
Chicago Parlor Car Exp.. * 1:00p.m. 
Chicago Parlor Car Exp., f 4:15p.m. 

Pacific Past Line f 7:30 a.m. 

Omaha Night Express.... f 4:15p.m. 

Denver Express f 7:30 a.m. 

Denver Short Line f 4:15 p.m. 

Sio'xCity&N.E.N'br'ska f 7:30a.m. 
Sio'xCity&N.E.N'br'ska f 4:15 p.m. 
Des Moines Day Express, f 7:30 a.m. 

Des Moines Night Exp f 4:15 p.m. 

Cedar Rapids Day Exp... f 7:30a.m. 
Cedar Rapids Night Exp. f 4:15p.m. 
Northwestern Iowa Exp. f 4:15 p.m. 

Freeport & Rockf ord f 1:00 p.m. 

St.Paul&Minneap'lisEx.* 2:20p.m. 
St.Paul&Minneap'lisEx. f 6:20p.m. 

Deadwood Express f 11:25 a.m. 

Dakota & Minnesota Ex. f 11:25 a. m. 
Winona & La Crosse Ex.. fll:25A.M. 
Galena&Montford Exp. f 11:25 a.m. 

Madison Express f ll:25A. m. 

Madison Express * 2:20p.m. 

Madison Express f 6:20p.m. 

Waukesha Express {11:25 a.m. 

Waukesha Express * 2:20p.m. 

Waukesha Express f 6:20p.m. 

FondduLac&G.B'yEx. f 7:30a.m. 
Gr'n Bay & Marin' t'e Ex. f 2:55 p.m. 
Gr'n Bay & Marin' t'e Ex. *12:15a. m. 
F'ndduL'c&Oshk'shEx. f 2:55p.m. 
F'nd duL'c&Oshk'sh Ex. *12: 15 a. m. 
Lake Superior Night Ex.. *12:15 a. m. 



leave. 



ARRIVE. 



*12:05a.m. 
f 8:00p.m. 
f 6:00p.m. 
|11:00a.m. 
f 2:30p.m. 
f 6:00p.m. 
{11:00 a.m. 
{ 6:30p.m. 
f 11:00 a.m. 
{ 6:00p.m. 
|11:00a.m. 
f 6:00p.m. 
f 11:00 a. m. 
f 6:00p.m. 
{11:00 a.m. 

flLOOA.M. 

{ 2:30p.m. 
*11:10a.m. 
|11:10a.m. 
f 4:25p.m. 
*11:10a.m. 
f 4:25p.m. 
{ 4:25p.m. 
*11:10a.m. 
f 4:25a.m. 
f 9:15p.m. 
*11:10a.m. 
f 4:25p.m. 
f 9:15 p.m. 
f 7:20p.m. 
{10:40 a.m. 

2:55 a.m. 
110:40 a.m. 

2:55a.m. 

2:55 a.m. 



Price List of Locks. 









Kinds 




No. 


Doz. 


Width. 


to the 


Black Japanned. 








dozen. 


79 


$1.25 


3 In. 


3 


Brass Bushed. 


101 


1.80 


" 


3 




99 


2.00 


4 " 


3 




123 


3.00 


3 " 


2 


2 Secure Levers, Brass 










Bushed, Flat Key. 




Red Japanned. 


85 


$3.00 


4 In. 


3 


Brass Bushed. 


116 


3.50 


3 " 


3 




114 


3.75 


8K " 


3 




088 


4.25 


4 " 


3 




122 


5.00 


4 " 


2 


2 Secure levers, flat key. 


108 


4.75 


4/ 2 " 


4 


111 


4.50 


4 " 


3 




118 


5.50 


4% " 


3 




124 


6.00 


4% " 


2 


2 Secure levers, flat key. 



METEOROLOGICAL REPORT. 









Wind. 






Stations. 


Bar. 


Th. 






R'in- 


Weath'r 








D. 


Vel 


fall. 




Milwaukee 


29.95 


55 


s w 


13 


.00 


Clear. 


Albany, N. Y... 


30.22 


49 


s w 


Lt. 


.00 


Clear. 


Bismarck, Dak. 


29.16 


56 


N 


6 


.00 


Thre't'g 


Buffalo, N.Y.... 


30.13 


54 


s 


6 


.00 


Clear. 


Cairo 111 


30.07 


65 


E 


Lt. 


.00 


Clear. 


Cheyenne, Wy.. 


30.03 


52 


S 


10 


.00 


Clear. 


Chicago, 111 


30.01 


57 


S 


8 


.001 CI ear. 


Cincinnati, 0... 


30.12 


60 


c'm 


c'm 


.00 


Clear. 


Cleveland, 0.... 


30.10 


52 


S E 


Lt. 


.00 


Clear. 


Detroit, Mich... 


30.07 


59 


S E 


6 


.00 


Clear. 


Duluth, Minn... 


29.66 


62 


s w 


16 


.00 


Fair. 


Erie, Pa 


30.13 


55 


S 


12 


.00 


Clear. 


Escanaba,M'h. 


29.81 


56 


s 


16 


.00 


Fair. 


Ft. Custer, Mon 


29.96 


55 


N 


Lt. 


.00 


Fair. 


Ft.Garry,Mon. 


29.59 


44 


N 


7 


.00 


Fair. 


Grand Haven.. 


30.00 


59 


s 


13 


.00 


Fair. 


Helena, Mon.... 


29.96 


44 


w 


Lt. 


.00 


Fair. 


Kingston, Can. 


30.08 


57 


s w 


12 


.00 


Smoky. 


La Crosse, Wis. 


29.86 


58 


s 


12 


.00 


Clear. 


Leavenworth . . 


29.94 


59 


s 


8 


.00 


Clear. 


Mackinac, M'h. 


29.89 


56 


s w 


8 


.00 


Fair. 


Marquette, M'h 


29.75 


59 


s w 


9 


.00 


Clear. 


New Orleans.... 


30.00 


76 


c'm 


c'm 


.00 


Clear. 


Omaha, Neb.... 


29.85 


62 


s 


20 


.00 


Clear. 


Oswego, N. Y... 


30.11 


57 


s 


14 


.00 


Clear. 



Parry Sound.. .|30.01| 

Port Huron |30.04| 

Rochester, N.Y| 20. 13 1 
St. Paul,Minn.. |29.73 1 
Sandusky, O.... |30.10 1 

Toledo, O........|30.08| 

Toronto, Can..|30.09| 
Vicksburg,Miss|30.08| 
Yankton, Dak.|29.67| 



54|sw| 10| 
53|s | 9| 
52|sw| 9| 
61[s | 11| 
55|sw| 10| 
56|NE|Lt.| 
47|sw| 6| 
61|N |Lt.| 
69|sw| 22| 



.00 1 Fair. 
.00 1 Clear. 
.00 1 Clear. 
.00|Fair. 
.00 1 Clear. 
.00 1 Clear. 
.00] Foggy. 
.00 1 Clear. 
.00 1 Cloudy. 



The lower part of above table is leaded to 
show the method of setting. 

COMMERCIAL —Statistics and Trade. 



Flour, bbls... 
Wheat, bu.... 

Corn,bu 

Oats,bu 

Barley, bu.... 

Rye, bu 

Malt, bu 

Peas, bu 

Potatoes, bu 
Timothy, lbs. 
Flaxseed, lbs. 
Hops, bales.. 

Hides, No 

Cattle, head. 
Sheep, head.. 
Live hogs, No 
Butter, lbs.... 
Eggs, pkgs.... 



Receipts. 



1884. 



18,188 
116,705 
960 
14,350 
28,700 
1,910 
817 



6,240 
24,000 
178,000 



310 
829 
149 
2,061 
7,060 
67 



1883. 



894 
542 
760 
534 
156 
951 



4 
2 

120 
999 



,462 
,450 
,000 
,999 

62 
679 
,236 
588 
,104 
,680 

51 



Shipments. 



1884. 1883 



24,205 



900 
37,646 



5,220 
2,865 
3,600 



20 



327 
35 
122 
8,863 



27,239 
101,425 
1,000 
1.100 

55,936 



900 
1,315 
1,600 
120,000 
960,000 
6 

1,000 
420 
344 
550 
21,930 
12 



Nonpareil Self Spacing Roman, No. 15. 
15 




Superior Goods. 



We base the claim for superiority of goods of our manufacture on the fact 
that we have made more and greater improvements in type and type making, in 
the past four years, than all the type founders of the United States combined, 
during a period of fifty years. Among them we mention the following : 

IMPROVED TYPE MACHINES AND METAL POTS — That greatly im- 
prove the quality and increase the quantity of type produced in a given time, 
making it possible and practicable to use one mold for any number of consecutive 
hours without stopping to allow it to "cool off." Possessed by no other foundry. 

PATENT IMPROVED TYPE MOLDS— That will cast thousands of pounds 
of any given character, and the last be exactly the size of the first one cast in 
same mold. Possessed by no other foundry, and we challenge any house to pro- 
duce like results. 

PATENT IMPROVED LEAD AND SLUG MACHINE— By the aid of which 
one man will produce more perfect 6-to-pica leads, 16 inches long, in ten hours, 
than ten men can produce in the same time by the old method. A feat that can- 
not be equalled by any house other than our own and those to whom we have 
granted the right to use our patented machinery. 

PATENT PUNCH ENGRAVING MACHINE — For cutting new faces. The 
only machine in the world for cutting type, borders, etc., from large drawings and 
patterns, in more perfect form than can be produced by any other foundry. Type 
cut by our new process, with sharp bevels and deep counters, will wear at least 
25 per cent, longer than any other type made. All of our Self Spacing faces are 
cut by this process, and we challenge the world to produce their equal. 

BENTON'S PATENT SELF SPACING TYPE. 

The most important advance in printing type in four centuries: A type 
which increases the speed of the compositor 25 per cent., and completely 
revolutionizes the principle of type making. 

IMPROVED FURNACES AND METAL MIXERS— Used only by us, for 
mixing our alloys of lead, tin, copper and antimony, with special reference to the 
chemical affinity of each, and so arranged that each metal can be subjected to the 
proper temperature to make a thorough admixture and perfect union of all in- 
gredients an absolute certainty. Our celebrated Durable Metal is noted for its 
uniform and lasting qualities, and as no old metals are ever used in its com- 
pounding, our customers can rely upon receiving the very best at all times.